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Bowel sounds analysis: a novel noninvasive method for diagnosis of small-volume ascites.

Liatsos, C; Hadjileontiadis, LJ; Mavrogiannis, C; Patch, D; Panas, SM; Burroughs, AK; (2003) Bowel sounds analysis: a novel noninvasive method for diagnosis of small-volume ascites. Dig Dis Sci , 48 (8) 1630 - 1636.

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Abstract

Ascites is more difficult to detect when only a small quantity is present. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the optimal bowel sound characteristics in order to distinguish no ascites from small-volume ascites by advanced processing of bowel sound wave patterns. This analysis results in the definition of the normal range of bowel sound patterns, thus providing a novel, simple, and noninvasive way of determining on abnormal pattern, which may reflect presence of small volume ascites. Cirrhotic patients with radiologically proven small-volume ascites and a control group were subjected to bowel sound recordings. The latter were analyzed using a denoising wavelet transform-based filter and a higher-order crossings-based technique in a blinded fashion for linearly distinguishing the two classes. Scatter plots of third-order zero crossings reflect distinct changes seen in the denoised bowel sound pattern between patients and controls due to altered transmission path, providing a distinct separation of all cirrhotic patients with small ascites from controls (P < 0.0001). We conclude that the proposed bowel sounds analysis appears to provide new information regarding the changes of the bowel sound patterns due to the presence of small-volume ascites, potentially contributing towards a safe, effective, noninvasive, and easily implemented alternative method for the diagnosis of small volume ascites at the bedside.

Type:Article
Title:Bowel sounds analysis: a novel noninvasive method for diagnosis of small-volume ascites.
Location:United States
Language:English
Keywords:Adult, Artifacts, Ascites, Female, Gastrointestinal Motility, Humans, Liver Cirrhosis, Male, Middle Aged, Oscillometry, Reference Values, Sensitivity and Specificity, Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted, Sound Spectrography, Stethoscopes

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