UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Biotechnology and new companies arising from academia

Vallance, P; (2001) Biotechnology and new companies arising from academia. The Lancet , 358 (9295) 1804 - 1806.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

20 years ago, an academic biomedical scientist or clinician who set up a company would probably have been perceived by colleagues as "on the make" and rather unacademic-"not one of us", in other words. Nowadays, academics who have started companies are commonplace, and in some universities the businessman-academic is becoming the norm, although still far more common in the USA than in Europe. At best, the opportunity to capitalise on a discovery has the potential to motivate research workers, provide greater funding for research, and ultimately create wealth. At worst, the spawning of a company from within academia has the potential to use public employees, space, and equipment for personal gain, and divert academics from the pursuit of profound scientific questions into more immediate product-driven research or even marketing dressed up as research. Here, I discuss some of the issues surrounding biotechnology and spin-off companies originating in academia

Type:Article
Title:Biotechnology and new companies arising from academia
Additional information:UI - 21592689 LA - eng PT - Journal Article DA - 20011205 IS - 0140-6736 SB - AIM SB - IM CY - England
Keywords:Academies and Institutes, As, biotechnology, clinical, CLINICIAN, COMMON, economics, EQUIPMENT, ethics, Europe, Funding, IM, industry, Intellectual Property, ISSUES, LA, Other, pharmacology, public, Research, Space, trends, Universities, USA, Use, wealth, word, WORKERS
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Medicine (Division of)

Archive Staff Only: edit this record