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Can PV or solar thermal systems be cost effective ways of reducing CO 2 emissions for residential buildings?

Croxford, B; Scott, K; (2006) Can PV or solar thermal systems be cost effective ways of reducing CO 2 emissions for residential buildings? In: Campbell-Howe, R, (ed.) Solar 2006: Renewable Energy - Key to Climate Recovery. American Solar Energy Society (ASES): Denver, US. Green open access

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Abstract

This paper compares two solar systems, an actual building integrated, photovoltaic roof (BIPV) and a notional solar thermal system for a residential block in London, UK. The carbon payback for the solar thermal system is 2 years, the BIPV system has a carbon payback of 6 years. Simple economic payback times for both systems are more than 50 years. Calculations considering the current UK energy price increase (10%/yr), reduce the economic payback time for the PV roof to under 30 years.The costs to reduce overall carbon dioxide emissions using a BIPV roof are £196/tonne CO2, solar thermal individual systems at £65/tonne CO2 and community solar thermal at £38/tonne CO2. The current spot market price for CO2 is £15/tonne CO2 (20). Capital costs for PV systems in particular must be significantly reduced for them to be a cost-effective way to reduce CO2. This paper compares two solar systems, an actual building integrated, photovoltaic roof (BIPV) and a notional solar thermal system for a residential block in London, UK. The carbon payback for the solar thermal system is 2 years, the BIPV system has a carbon payback of 6 years. Simple economic payback times for both systems are more than 50 years. Calculations considering the current UK energy price increase (10%/yr), reduce the economic payback time for the PV roof to under 30 years.The costs to reduce overall carbon dioxide emissions using a BIPV roof are £196/tonne CO2, solar thermal individual systems at £65/tonne CO2 and community solar thermal at £38/tonne CO2. The current spot market price for CO2 is £15/tonne CO2 (20). Capital costs for PV systems in particular must be significantly reduced for them to be a cost-effective way to reduce CO2.

Type: Proceedings paper
Title: Can PV or solar thermal systems be cost effective ways of reducing CO 2 emissions for residential buildings?
ISBN-13: 9781604232882
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Full text provided with kind permission of ASES. Paper presented at Solar 2006, held 9-13 July 2006, Denver, Colorado, US.
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/2642
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