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Probing the plasticity of the brain with TMS

Rothwell, JC; (2007) Probing the plasticity of the brain with TMS. In: Wu, LJ and Ito, K and Tobimatsu, S and Nishida, T and Fukuyama, H, (eds.) Complex Medical Engineering. (pp. 481 - 487). SPRINGER

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Abstract

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was originally developed as a convenient way of delivering an electrical stimulating pulse across the resistive barrier of the skull and scalp into the brain. The currents induced in the brain are brief, and similar in magnitude and time course to those produced by a conventional peripheral nerve stimulator. The advantage is that the Stimulation is almost painless and can readily be applied in conscious human subject, allowing us for the first time to directly manipulate brain activity. It turns out that if stimuli are given repetitively, it is possible to induce effects on the brain that outlast the period of stimulation for minutes or even hours and days. It is these effects that may provide a window to probe mechanisms of neural plasticity in the intact human brain.

Type: Proceedings paper
Title: Probing the plasticity of the brain with TMS
Event: 1st International Conference on Complex Medical Engineering (CME2005)
Location: Takamatsu, JAPAN
Dates: 2005
ISBN-13: 978-4-431-30961-1
Keywords: TMS (trans-cranial magnetic stimulation), TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION, LONG-TERM DEPRESSION, HUMAN MOTOR CORTEX, INDUCTION, RTMS
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/21092
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