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Sparse machine learning methods with applications in multivariate signal processing

Diethe, T.R.; (2010) Sparse machine learning methods with applications in multivariate signal processing. Doctoral thesis, UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

This thesis details theoretical and empirical work that draws from two main subject areas: Machine Learning (ML) and Digital Signal Processing (DSP). A unified general framework is given for the application of sparse machine learning methods to multivariate signal processing. In particular, methods that enforce sparsity will be employed for reasons of computational efficiency, regularisation, and compressibility. The methods presented can be seen as modular building blocks that can be applied to a variety of applications. Application specific prior knowledge can be used in various ways, resulting in a flexible and powerful set of tools. The motivation for the methods is to be able to learn and generalise from a set of multivariate signals. In addition to testing on benchmark datasets, a series of empirical evaluations on real world datasets were carried out. These included: the classification of musical genre from polyphonic audio files; a study of how the sampling rate in a digital radar can be reduced through the use of Compressed Sensing (CS); analysis of human perception of different modulations of musical key from Electroencephalography (EEG) recordings; classification of genre of musical pieces to which a listener is attending from Magnetoencephalography (MEG) brain recordings. These applications demonstrate the efficacy of the framework and highlight interesting directions of future research.

Type:Thesis (Doctoral)
Title:Sparse machine learning methods with applications in multivariate signal processing
Open access status:An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language:English

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