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Impact of rapid molecular screening for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in surgical wards

Keshtgar, MRS; Khalili, A; Coen, PG; Carder, C; Macrae, B; Jeanes, A; ... Wilson, APR; + view all (2008) Impact of rapid molecular screening for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in surgical wards. BRIT J SURG , 95 (3) 381 - 386. 10.1002/bjs.6013.

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Abstract

Background: This study aimed to establish the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of rapid molecular screening for hospital-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in surgical patients within a teaching hospital.Methods: In 2006, nasal swabs were obtained before surgery from all patients undergoing elective and emergency procedures, and screened for MRSA using a rapid molecular technique. MRSA-positive patients were started on suppression therapy of mupirocin nasal ointment (2 per cent) and undiluted chlorhexidine gluconate bodywash.Results: A total of 18 810 samples were processed, of which 850 (4.5 per cent) were MRSA positive. In comparison to the annual mean for the preceding 6 years, MRSA bacteraemia fell by 38.5 per cent (P < 0.001), and MRSA wound isolates fell by 12.7 per cent (P = 0.031). The reduction in MRSA bacteraemia and wound infection was equivalent to a saving of 3.78 beds per year (276 pound 220), compared with the annual mean for the preceding 6 years. The cost of screening was 302 pound 500, making a net loss of 26 pound 280. Compared with 2005, however, there was a net saving of 545 pound 486.Conclusion: Rapid MRSA screening of all surgical admissions resulted in a significant reduction in staphylococcal bacteraemia during the screening period, although a causal link cannot be established.

Type:Article
Title:Impact of rapid molecular screening for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in surgical wards
DOI:10.1002/bjs.6013
Keywords:INFECTION, COLONIZATION, REDUCTION
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Infection and Immunity (Division of) > Research Department of Infection
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Surgery and Interventional Science (Division of)

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