UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

P2Y purinergic receptors regulate the growth of human melanomas

White, N; Ryten, M; Burnstock, G; Butler, P; Clayton, E; (2005) P2Y purinergic receptors regulate the growth of human melanomas. Cancer Letters , 224 (1) 81 - 91. 10.1016/j.canlet.2004.11.027.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Adenosine 5′-triphosphate is known to function as a potent extracellular messenger producing its effects via a distinct family of cell surface receptors. Different receptor subtypes have been shown to modulate different cellular functions such as proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. We investigated the functional expression and proliferative action of metabotropic P2Y receptors in human melanoma tissue and cells. Expression of functional P2Y, P2Y and P2Y receptor subtypes was established by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and intracellular calcium measurements using a Fluorometric Imaging Plate Reader. Incubation of A375 melanoma cells with the P2Y receptor-selective agonist 2-methylthioadenosine-5-diphosphate caused a decrease in cell number which was dose-dependent, whereas incubation with the P2Y receptor agonist uridine triphosphate caused a dose-dependent increase in cell number. The action of extracellular nucleotides on P2Y receptors was shown to mediate the growth of melanomas and the P2Y receptor is a putative target for melanoma therapy. © 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Type:Article
Title:P2Y purinergic receptors regulate the growth of human melanomas
DOI:10.1016/j.canlet.2004.11.027
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Institute of Neurology
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Biosciences (Division of)
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Surgery and Interventional Science (Division of)

Archive Staff Only: edit this record