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Soluble thrombomodulin concentration is raised in scleroderma associated pulmonary hypertension

Stratton, RJ; Pompon, L; Coghlan, JG; Pearson, JD; Black, CM; (2000) Soluble thrombomodulin concentration is raised in scleroderma associated pulmonary hypertension. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases , 59 (2) 132 - 134.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the expression of thrombomodulin in scleroderma associated pulmonary hypertension. METHODS: Soluble thrombomodulin (sTM), was measured in plasma samples from 34 scleroderma patients shown to have pulmonary hypertension at echocardiogram, and comparison drawn against samples from 38 scleroderma control patients, and 20 healthy controls. Serial measurements of sTM were performed in the 34 patients with scleroderma associated pulmonary hypertension to investigate possible changes in sTM concentration with progression of the condition. RESULTS: Mean sTM was raised in scleroderma associated pulmonary hypertension when compared with scleroderma controls (mean sTM 65.4 ng/ml v 43.3 ng/ml, p<0.05), and when compared with healthy controls (mean sTM 38.1 ng/ml, p<0.05). There was no significant difference between mean sTM in scleroderma controls and healthy controls. Mean sTM concentration did not change with progression of pulmonary hypertension. CONCLUSION: Plasma sTM is raised in scleroderma associated pulmonary hypertension. The pathogenesis of scleroderma associated pulmonary hypertension may be distinct from the pathogenesis of other forms of pulmonary vascular disease

Type:Article
Title:Soluble thrombomodulin concentration is raised in scleroderma associated pulmonary hypertension
Additional information:UI - 20129432 LA - eng RN - 0 (Thrombomodulin) PT - Journal Article DA - 20000330 IS - 0003-4967 SB - IM CY - ENGLAND JC - 62W
Keywords:0 (Thrombomodulin), adult, Blood, CM, comparison, complications, control, Cross-Sectional Studies, difference, disease, Disease Progression, etiology, expression, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Form, HEALTHY, Hypertension, Pulmonary, Male, May, measurement, Methods, Middle Age, Other, PATHOGENESIS, Patient, patients, plasma, PROGRESSION, pulmonary, SAMPLE, SCLERODERMA, Scleroderma, Systemic, SOLUBILITY, Support, Non-U.S.Gov't, Thrombomodulin, Tissue, vascular, Vascular Disease, adult
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Medicine (Division of)

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