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Sequentiality as a problem and a resource for intersubjectivity in aphasic conversation: analysis and implications for therapy

Wilkinson, R; (1999) Sequentiality as a problem and a resource for intersubjectivity in aphasic conversation: analysis and implications for therapy. Aphasiology , 13 (4) 327 - 343.

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Abstract

Investigations of non-aphasic conversation have displayed the importance of sequentiality in the meaning and understanding of utterances in conversation. Sequentiality refers to the way in which an utterance is constructed so as to display its relation to the immediately preceding utterances and to make expectable certain type of utterance in the following turn. As such it has been shown to be a central resource for participants in achieving intersubjectivity, or a state of mutual understanding, in conversation. In this paper sequentiality in aphasic conversation is investigated. It is found that aphasia can disrupt the speaker's ability to display the sequential properties of utterances in conversation and can therefore be an important reason why certain aphasic turns can be difficult for hearers to understand. However, aphasic speakers are also shown to be able to use the sequential context of earlier turns as a resource to aid communication by referring deictically to prior utterances. It is suggested that these findings have clinical importance in assessing functional language use and planning therapy. In particular it is noted that these conversational problems may require a different approach to the types of therapy employed for disorders at the word and sentence level. Some ways in which a more interactionally-focused therapy may target these problems are discussed

Type:Article
Title:Sequentiality as a problem and a resource for intersubjectivity in aphasic conversation: analysis and implications for therapy
Keywords:conversation, analysis, therapy, aphasia, communication, planning, ANS, abilities
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Psychology and Language Sciences (Division of) > Language and Communication
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences

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