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Psychological theories of posttraumatic stress disorder

Brewin, CR; Holmes, EA; (2003) Psychological theories of posttraumatic stress disorder. CLIN PSYCHOL REV , 23 (3) 339 - 376. 10.1016/S0272-7358(03)00033-3.

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Abstract

We summarize recent research on the psychological processes implicated in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as an aid to evaluating theoretical models of the disorder. After describing a number of early approaches, including social-cognitive, conditioning, information-processing, and anxious apprehension models of PTSD, the article provides a comparative analysis and evaluation of three recent theories: Foa and Rothbaum's [Foa, E. B. & Rothbaum, B. O. (1998). Treating the trauma of rape: cognitive behavioral therapy for PTSD. New York: Guilford Press] emotional processing theory; Brewin, Dalgleish, and Joseph's [Psychological Review 103 (1996) 670] dual representation theory; Ehlers and Clark's [Behaviour Research and Therapy 38 (2000) 319] cognitive theory. We review empirical evidence relevant to each model and identify promising areas for further research. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Type:Article
Title:Psychological theories of posttraumatic stress disorder
DOI:10.1016/S0272-7358(03)00033-3
Keywords:posttraumatic stress, cognition, emotion, memory, therapy, COGNITIVE-PROCESSING THERAPY, MOTOR-VEHICLE ACCIDENTS, SEXUAL ASSAULT VICTIMS, PERITRAUMATIC DISSOCIATION, INTRUSIVE MEMORIES, VIOLENT CRIME, PROLONGED EXPOSURE, TRAUMATIC EVENTS, PTSD SYMPTOMS, CAUSAL ATTRIBUTIONS
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Psychology and Language Sciences (Division of) > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences

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