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The coding of noxious mechanical and thermal stimuli of deep dorsal horn neurones is attenuated in NK1 knockout mice

Suzuki, R; Hunt, SP; Dickenson, AH; (2003) The coding of noxious mechanical and thermal stimuli of deep dorsal horn neurones is attenuated in NK1 knockout mice. NEUROPHARMACOLOGY , 45 (8) 1093 - 1100. 10.1016/S0028-3908(03)00281-8.

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Abstract

Previous behavioural evidence has shown that NK1 receptor gene knockout (NK1 -/-) mice display altered nociceptive responses following tissue or peripheral nerve injury. A single electrophysiological study reported an attenuation of wind-up and responses to mustard oil application. Although the behavioural results implicate SP and its receptor (NK1-R) in the transmission of noxious high intensity pain, little is known regarding the spinal neuronal substrates and the modalities involved.We have addressed this using in vivo electrophysiology and recordings of deep dorsal horn neurones in urethane-anaesthetised C57B6 x 129/sv mice to reveal a marked deficit in mechanical and thermal coding, selectively encompassing the suprathreshold range of noxious stimuli. The frequency-dependent increase in neuronal activity following repetitive C-fibre stimulation (wind-up) was also abolished in spinal neurones of NK1-R knockout mice. Quantification of the receptive field size of spinal neurotics, mapped with low- and high-intensity mechanical punctate stimuli, revealed no differences between NK1 -/- and wildtype mice. We conclude that NK1-Rs are important in the high intensity noxious signalling of acute peripheral (mechanical/thermal) stimuli and this may result from the lack of wind-up and/or the disruption of spinal-bulbo-spinal loops. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Type: Article
Title: The coding of noxious mechanical and thermal stimuli of deep dorsal horn neurones is attenuated in NK1 knockout mice
DOI: 10.1016/S0028-3908(03)00281-8
Keywords: spinal cord, substance P, wind-up, rat, electrophysiology, SUBSTANCE-P RECEPTOR, LAMINA-I NEURONS, SPINAL-CORD, NEUROKININ-1 RECEPTORS, PAIN, HYPERALGESIA, RESPONSES, RAT, NOCICEPTION, CAPSAICIN
UCL classification: UCL > Office of the President and Provost
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Biosciences (Division of)
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Biosciences (Division of) > Cell and Developmental Biology
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Biosciences (Division of) > Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/185513
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