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Encoding and the durability of episodic memory: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

Uncapher, MR; Rugg, MD; (2005) Encoding and the durability of episodic memory: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study. Journal of Neuroscience , 25 7260 - 7267. Green open access

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Abstract

Memories vary in their durability even when encoding conditions apparently remain constant. We investigated whether, under these circumstances, memory durability is nonetheless associated with variation in the neural activity elicited during encoding. Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired while volunteers semantically classified visually presented words. Using the “remember/know” procedure, memory for one-half of the words was tested after 30 min and for the remaining half after 48 h. In several regions, including left hippocampus and left dorsal inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), activity at encoding differed depending on whether items were later recollected regardless of study–test delay. Delay-selective effects were also evident, however. Recollection after 48 h was associated with enhanced activity in bilateral ventral IFG, whereas recollection after 30 min was associated with greater fusiform activity. Thus, there is a relationship between the neural activity elicited by an event as it is encoded and the durability of the resulting memory representation.

Type:Article
Title:Encoding and the durability of episodic memory: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.
Open access status:An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language:English
Additional information:This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. The license allows you to copy, distribute, and transmit the work, as well as adapting it. However, you must attribute the work to the author (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work), and cannot use the work for commercial purposes without prior permission of the author. If you alter or build upon this work, you can distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar license to this one. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 444 Castro Street, Suite 900, Mountain View, California, 94041, USA.
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Psychology and Language Sciences (Division of) > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences

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