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Individual differences in true and false memory retrieval are related to white matter brain microstructure

Fuentemilla, L; Camara, E; Müunte, T; F, C; T, M-P; J, T; ... A, .; + view all (2009) Individual differences in true and false memory retrieval are related to white matter brain microstructure. Journal of Neuroscience , 29 (27) 8698 - 8703. Green open access

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Abstract

We sometimes vividly remember things that did not happen, a phenomenon with general relevance not only in the court-room. It is unclear, to what extent individual differences in false memories are driven by anatomical differences in memory relevant brain regions. Here we show in humans that microstructural properties of different white matter tracts as quantified using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) are strongly correlated with true and false memory recollection. To investigate these hypotheses we tested a large group of participants in a version of the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm (recall and recognition) and subsequently obtained DTI images. A voxel-based whole-brain level linear regression analysis was performed to relate fractional anisotropy to indices of true and false memory recall and recognition. True memory was correlated to diffusion anisotropy in the inferior longitudinal fascicle, the major connective pathway of the medial temporal lobe, whereas a greater proneness to retrieve false items was related to the superior longitudinal fascicle connecting fronto-parietal structures. Our results show that individual differences in white-matter micro-structure underlie true and false memory performance.

Type:Article
Title:Individual differences in true and false memory retrieval are related to white matter brain microstructure
Open access status:An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language:English
Additional information:This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. The license allows you to copy, distribute, and transmit the work, as well as adapting it. However, you must attribute the work to the author (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work), and cannot use the work for commercial purposes without prior permission of the author. If you alter or build upon this work, you can distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar license to this one. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 444 Castro Street, Suite 900, Mountain View, California, 94041, USA.
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Psychology and Language Sciences (Division of) > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences

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