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Dominant-negative calcium channel suppression by truncated constructs involves a kinase implicated in the unfolded protein response

Page, KM; Heblich, F; Davies, A; Butcher, AJ; Leroy, J; Bertaso, F; Pratt, WS; (2004) Dominant-negative calcium channel suppression by truncated constructs involves a kinase implicated in the unfolded protein response. Journal of Neuroscience , 24 (23) 5400 - 5409. Green open access

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Abstract

Expression of the calcium channel Ca(V)2.2 is markedly suppressed by coexpression with truncated constructs of Ca(V)2.2. Furthermore, a two-domain construct of Ca(V)2.1 mimicking an episodic ataxia-2 mutation strongly inhibited Ca(V)2.1 currents. We have now determined the specificity of this effect, identified a potential mechanism, and have shown that such constructs also inhibit endogenous calcium currents when transfected into neuronal cell lines. Suppression of calcium channel expression requires interaction between truncated and full-length channels, because there is inter-subfamily specificity. Although there is marked cross-suppression within the Ca(V)2 calcium channel family, there is no cross-suppression between Ca(V)2 and Ca(V)3 channels. The mechanism involves activation of a component of the unfolded protein response, the endoplasmic reticulum resident RNA-dependent kinase (PERK), because it is inhibited by expression of dominant-negative constructs of this kinase. Activation of PERK has been shown previously to cause translational arrest, which has the potential to result in a generalized effect on protein synthesis. In agreement with this, coexpression of the truncated domain I of Ca(V)2.2, together with full-length Ca(V)2.2, reduced the level not only of Ca(V)2.2 protein but also the coexpressed alpha2delta-2. Thapsigargin, which globally activates the unfolded protein response, very markedly suppressed Ca(V)2.2 currents and also reduced the expression level of both Ca(V)2.2 and alpha2delta-2 protein. We propose that voltage-gated calcium channels represent a class of difficult-to-fold transmembrane proteins, in this case misfolding is induced by interaction with a truncated cognate Ca(V) channel. This may represent a mechanism of pathology in episodic ataxia-2.

Type: Article
Title: Dominant-negative calcium channel suppression by truncated constructs involves a kinase implicated in the unfolded protein response
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. The license allows you to copy, distribute, and transmit the work, as well as adapting it. However, you must attribute the work to the author (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work), and cannot use the work for commercial purposes without prior permission of the author. If you alter or build upon this work, you can distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar license to this one. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 444 Castro Street, Suite 900, Mountain View, California, 94041, USA.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences > Neuro, Physiology and Pharmacology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/181083
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