UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

TT virus infection in patients with primary hypogammaglobulinaemia: natural history and relationship to liver disease in the immunocompromised host

Bjoro, K; Petrova, EP; Thomas, MG; Froland, SS; Williams, R; Naoumov, NV; (2001) TT virus infection in patients with primary hypogammaglobulinaemia: natural history and relationship to liver disease in the immunocompromised host. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology , 36 (9) 987-93 - ?.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: TT virus (TTV) is a recently discovered human DNA virus with worldwide distribution, but with no clear disease association. The possibility of an enhanced TTV virulence in patients with immunodeficiencies has not yet been investigated but is of particular interest because other viruses have been demonstrated to cause severe and rapid liver disease in such patients. Here we analysed the characteristics of TTV infection in a large cohort of patients with primary hypogammaglobulinaemia (PHG) and whether TTV has a role in the frequently observed cryptogenic liver disease in these patients. METHODS: 83 Norwegian patients with PHG (serum immunoglobulin G < 2 g/L), receiving substitution treatment with immunoglobulins, were followed regularly for median 10.2 years (range 2-30). TTV DNA was sought in serum samples and three immunoglobulin preparations by polymerase chain reaction; TTV DNA quantitation, DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis were performed in selected samples. RESULTS: TTV DNA was detected in 27 of 83 (32.5%) patients and was not associated with a particular type of PHG. The prevalence of TTV infection was dependent on intravenous immunoglobulin administration, duration of therapy and patient's age. TTV DNA was found in two of three currently used immunoglobulin preparations. In the longitudinal study, whether TTV was cleared or newly acquired had no impact on liver function tests and no particular TTV strain was found in patients with more severe liver disease. CONCLUSIONS: TTV infection is common in patients with PHG. Treatment with immunoglobulins has a role in the transmission of TTV in these patients. However, we found no evidence of TTV-induced liver disease in this group of immunocompromised patients.

Type:Article
Title:TT virus infection in patients with primary hypogammaglobulinaemia: natural history and relationship to liver disease in the immunocompromised host
Additional information:Sep, eng
Keywords:disease, liver, acquired, Administration, adult, AGAMMAGLOBULINEMIA, age, analysis, Association, CHAIN, CHAIN-REACTION, characteristics, COHORT, Cohort Studies, COMMON, disease, Disease Association, distribution, DNA, DNA Virus Infections, Dna, Viral, DURATION, enhanced, epidemiology, Female, Follow-Up Studies, function, function test, Hepatitis, History, Host, IM, immunocompromised, Immunocompromised Host, IMMUNOCOMPROMISED PATIENTS, immunodeficiencies, immunodeficiency, IMMUNOGLOBULIN, IMMUNOGLOBULIN G, IMMUNOGLOBULINS, Immunoglobulins, Intravenous, immunology, impact, Infection, INTRAVENOUS, isolation & purification, LA, LIVER DISEASE, Liver Function, Liver Function Test, Liver Function Tests, LIVER-DISEASE, Longitudinal, Longitudinal Studies, longitudinal study, Male, Methods, NATURAL HISTORY, NATURAL-HISTORY, NO EVIDENCE, Other, Patient, patients, polymerase, Polymerase Chain Reaction, POLYMERASE-CHAIN-REACTION, Preparation, Prevalence, quantitation, RANGE, relationship, Result, Role, SAMPLE, SAMPLES, sequencing, SERA, serum, Strain, SUBSTITUTION, Support, Non-U.S.Gov't, TESTS, therapeutic use, THERAPIES, therapy, Time Factors, Transfusion-Transmitted Virus, transmission, treatment, TT virus, viral, virology, Virulence, VIRUS, VIRUS INFECTION, VIRUS-INFECTION, VIRUSES, Adult, Agammaglobulinemia/immunology/*virology, DNA Virus Infections/epidemiology/*immunology/transmission, Viral/isolation & purification, Viral, Human/immunology/*virology, Humans, *Immunocompromised Host, Intravenous/therapeutic use, *Torque teno virus/isolation & purification
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Biosciences (Division of) > Genetics, Evolution and Environment
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Medicine (Division of)

Archive Staff Only: edit this record