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Diagnostic fine-needle aspiration in postoperative wound infections is more accurate at predicting causative organisms than wound swabs

Parikh, AR; Hamilton, S; Sivarajan, V; Withey, S; Butler, PE; (2007) Diagnostic fine-needle aspiration in postoperative wound infections is more accurate at predicting causative organisms than wound swabs. Ann.R.Coll.Surg.Engl. , 89 (2) 166 - 167.

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Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Postoperative wound infections are common. Antibiotics are often prescribed empirically, usually in the absence of any microbiological sensitivity data. This study demonstrates the role of fine-needle aspiration microbiology (FNAM) in determining the causative organisms in these wounds compared to wound swabs taken from the same patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 20 patients with clinical signs of soft tissue infection were tested using wound swabs and fine-needle aspiration. RESULTS: Six of the wound swabs yielded a single organism but 16 out 20 of the FNAM group yielded a single organism (P = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: The FNAM approach allows antibiotic sensitivities to be obtained enabling specific antimicrobial therapy to be implemented early. FNAM also has a higher yield of cultures than wound swabs. Cellulitic areas can be sampled even when use of wound swabs is not possible

Type:Article
Title:Diagnostic fine-needle aspiration in postoperative wound infections is more accurate at predicting causative organisms than wound swabs
Additional information:DA - 20070309IS - 1478-7083 (Electronic)LA - engPT - Journal ArticleSB - IM
Keywords:infection, wound swab, fine-needle aspiration, FNAM, Adult, Aged, Bacterial Infections, Biopsy, Fine-Needle, diagnosis, Humans, London, methods, microbiology, Middle Aged, Role, Sensitivity and Specificity, standards, surgery, Surgical Sponges, Surgical Wound Infection, therapy
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Surgery and Interventional Science (Division of)

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