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Trends in sexually transmitted infections in general practice 1990-2000: population based study using data from the UK general practice research database

Cassell, JA; Mercer, CH; Sutcliffe, L; Petersen, I; Islam, A; Brook, MG; Ross, JD; ... Hayward, AC; + view all (2006) Trends in sexually transmitted infections in general practice 1990-2000: population based study using data from the UK general practice research database. BRIT MED J , 332 (7537) 332 - 334. 10.1136/bmj.38726.404120.7C. Gold open access

Abstract

Objective To describe the contribution of primary care to the diagnosis and management of sexually transmitted infections in the United Kingdom, 1990-2000, in the context of increasing incidence of infections in genitourinary medicine clinics.Design Population based Study.Setting UK primary care.Participants Patients registered in the UK general practice research database.Main outcome measures Incidence of diagnosed sexually transmitted infections in primary care and estimation of the proportion of major such infections diagnosed in primary care.Results An estimated 23.0% of chlamydia cases in women but only 5.3% in men were diagnosed and treated in primary care during 1998-2000, along with 49.2% cases of non-specific urethritis and urethral discharge in men and 5.7% cases of gonorrhoea in women and 2.9% in men. Rates of diagnosis in primary care rose Substantially in the late 1990s.Conclusions A substantial and increasing number of sexually transmitted infections are diagnosed and treated in primary care in the United Kingdom, with sex ratios differing from those in genitourinary medicine clinics. Large numbers of men are treated in primary care for presumptive sexually transmitted infections.

Type: Article
Title: Trends in sexually transmitted infections in general practice 1990-2000: population based study using data from the UK general practice research database
Open access status: An open access publication
DOI: 10.1136/bmj.38726.404120.7C
Publisher version: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/ articles/PMC13639...
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Inst for Women's Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Inst for Women's Health > Reproductive Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health > Infection and Population Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Primary Care and Population Health
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/176380
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