UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Inappropriate association of semantics and context to novel stimuli can give rise to the false recognition of unfamiliar people

Ward, J; Jones, L; (2003) Inappropriate association of semantics and context to novel stimuli can give rise to the false recognition of unfamiliar people. Neuropsychologia , 41 (5) 538 - 549. 10.1016/S0028-3932(02)00172-0.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

This paper reports further experiments with a patient (MR) who has a tendency to claim that unfamous people are familiar together with good ability at identifying truly famous people. The first experiment examines the role that the typicality of stimuli plays in his false recognition. Although, typicality may have some influence over false recognition (as it does for normal controls) there is little evidence to suggest that MR is over-reliant on such information. It is unlikely that perceptual fluency can entirely explain his deficit. This is bolstered by a further study using morphed images of famous and unfamous faces, suggesting that false recognition is associated with inappropriate retrieval of semantic-biographical information. It is argued that MR's judgement of 'fame' is subjectively appropriate, given the information that he retrieves. This information is thought to derive from currently activated, or recently activated, contextual information which becomes inappropriately bound to the novel stimulus, giving rise to a false sense of familiarity. These findings underscore the importance of viewing memory as an attributional process, whereby current mental constructions/processes are attributed to some event(s) in the past. © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Type:Article
Title:Inappropriate association of semantics and context to novel stimuli can give rise to the false recognition of unfamiliar people
DOI:10.1016/S0028-3932(02)00172-0
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Psychology and Language Sciences (Division of) > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences

Archive Staff Only: edit this record