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Risk factors and medical follow-up of drug users tested for hepatitis C - can the risk of transmission be reduced?

Serfaty, MA; Lawrie, A; Smith, B; Brind, AM; Watson, JP; Gilvarry, E; Bassendine, MF; (1997) Risk factors and medical follow-up of drug users tested for hepatitis C - can the risk of transmission be reduced? DRUG ALCOHOL REV , 16 (4) 339 - 347.

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Abstract

Of 1728 patients attending a regional drug and alcohol clinic, 202 were considered at risk of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Forty-nine per cent (99/202) agreed to testing-67% (67) were HCV antibody positive. Age and a history of needle sharing was the significant factor associated with positive HCV status. Patients on methadone maintenance medication were more-likely to have been HCV positive, but significantly (p = 0.005) less likely to have shared needles in the previous year. Seventy-three per cent (49/67) attended for follow-up at a "liver clinic". Fifty per cent were infected with genotype la. Eighteen patients were biopsied and all were abnormal, ranging from mild hepatitis to severe fibrotic hepatitis. Attendance for medical follow-up was poor, which emphasizes the importance of preventative measures such as methadone maintenance programmes for reducing the spread of HCV.

Type: Article
Title: Risk factors and medical follow-up of drug users tested for hepatitis C - can the risk of transmission be reduced?
Keywords: hepatitis C, intravenous drug users, risk factors, medical follow-up, methadone maintenance, VIRUS-INFECTION, BLOOD-DONORS, INTERFERON, GENOTYPES, EPIDEMIOLOGY, PREVALENCE, THERAPY, COHORT
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Division of Psychiatry
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/170242
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