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Usability evaluation of digital libraries: a tutorial

Fields, B.; Keith, S.; Blandford, A.; (2003) Usability evaluation of digital libraries: a tutorial. Presented at: Joint Conference on Digital Libraries (JCDL) 2003, Houston, US. Green open access

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Abstract

This one-day tutorial is an introduction to usability evaluation for Digital Libraries. In particular, we will introduce Claims Analysis. This approach focuses on the designers’ motivations and reasons for making particular design decisions and examines the effect on the user’s interaction with the system. The general approach, as presented by Carroll and Rosson(1992), has been tailored specifically to the design of digital libraries. Digital libraries are notoriously difficult to design well in terms of their eventual usability. In this tutorial, we will present an overview of usability issues and techniques for digital libraries, and a more detailed account of claims analysis, including two supporting techniques – simple cognitive analysis based on Norman’s ‘action cycle’ and Scenarios and personas. Through a graduated series of worked examples, participants will get hands-on experience of applying this approach to developing more usable digital libraries. This tutorial assumes no prior knowledge of usability evaluation, and is aimed at all those involved in the development and deployment of digital libraries.

Type:Conference item (Presentation)
Title:Usability evaluation of digital libraries: a tutorial
Event:Joint Conference on Digital Libraries (JCDL) 2003
Location:Houston, US
Dates:27 - 31 May, 2003
Open access status:An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Publisher version:http://www.jcdl.org/archived-conf-sites/jcdl2003/tutorials.html
Language:English
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Psychology and Language Sciences (Division of) > UCL Interaction Centre

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