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Information seeking in the Humanities: physicality and digitality

Rimmer, J.; Warwick, C.; Blandford, A.; Gow, J.; Buchanan, G.; (2008) Information seeking in the Humanities: physicality and digitality. In: Ghazali, M. and Ramduny-Ellis, D. and Hornecker, E. and Dix, A., (eds.) Physicality 2006: Proceedings of the First International Workshop on Physicality. (pp. pp. 37-38). Computing Department, Lancaster University: Lancaster, UK. Green open access

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Abstract

This paper presents a brief overview of a research project that is examining the information seeking practices of humanities scholars. The results of this project are being used to develop digital resources to better support these work activities. Initial findings from a recent set of interviews is offered, revealing the importance of physical artefacts in the humanities scholars’ research processes and the limitations of digital resources. Finally, further work that is soon to be undertaken is summarised, and it is hoped that after participation in this workshop these ideas will be refined.

Type:Proceedings paper
Title:Information seeking in the Humanities: physicality and digitality
ISBN:9781862201781
Open access status:An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Publisher version:http://www.physicality.org/Physicality_2006/Entries/2008/3/8_Physicality_2006_proceedings.html
Language:English
Additional information:Workshop held at Lancaster University, UK, 6 - 7 February 2006
Keywords:Digital libraries, humanities, information seeking
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Psychology and Language Sciences (Division of) > UCL Interaction Centre
UCL > School of Arts and Social Sciences > Faculty of Arts and Humanities > Information Studies

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