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Mortality from HIV and TB coinfections is higher in Eastern Europe than in Western Europe and Argentina.

Podlekareva, DN; Mocroft, A; Post, FA; Riekstina, V; Miro, JM; Furrer, H; Bruyand, M; ... HIV/TB Study Writing Group, ; + view all (2009) Mortality from HIV and TB coinfections is higher in Eastern Europe than in Western Europe and Argentina. AIDS , 23 (18) pp. 2485-2495. 10.1097/QAD.0b013e3283326879.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Tuberculosis (TB) is a leading cause of death in HIV-infected patients worldwide. We aimed to study clinical characteristics and outcome of 1075 consecutive patients diagnosed with HIV/TB from 2004 to 2006 in Europe and Argentina. METHODS: One-year mortality was assessed in patients stratified according to region of residence, and factors associated with death were evaluated in multivariable Cox models. RESULTS: At TB diagnosis, patients in Eastern Europe had less advanced immunodeficiency, whereas a greater proportion had a history of intravenous drug use, coinfection with hepatitis C, disseminated TB, and infection with drug-resistant TB (P < 0.0001). In Eastern Europe, fewer patients initiated TB treatment containing at least rifamycin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide or combination antiretroviral therapy (P < 0.0001). Mortality at 1 year was 27% in Eastern Europe, compared with 7, 9 and 11% in Central/Northern Europe, Southern Europe, and Argentina, respectively (P < 0.0001). In a multivariable model, the adjusted relative hazard of death was significantly lower in each of the other regions compared with Eastern Europe: 0.34 (95% confidence interval 0.17-0.65), 0.28 (0.14-0.57), 0.34 (0.15-0.77) in Argentina, Southern Europe and Central/Northern Europe, respectively. Factors significantly associated with increased mortality were CD4 cell count less than 200 cells/microl [2.31 (1.56-3.45)], prior AIDS [1.74 (1.22-2.47)], disseminated TB [2.00 (1.38-2.85)], initiation of TB treatment not including rifamycin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide [1.68 (1.20-2.36)], and rifamycin resistance [2.10 (1.29-3.41)]. Adjusting for these known confounders did not explain the increased mortality seen in Eastern Europe. CONCLUSION: The poor outcome of patients with HIV/TB in Eastern Europe deserves further study and urgent public health attention.

Type: Article
Title: Mortality from HIV and TB coinfections is higher in Eastern Europe than in Western Europe and Argentina.
Location: England
DOI: 10.1097/QAD.0b013e3283326879
Keywords: Adult, Argentina, CD4 Lymphocyte Count, Europe, Europe, Eastern, Female, HIV Infections, HIV-1, Humans, Male, Population Surveillance, Proportional Hazards Models, Risk Factors, Tuberculosis
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute for Global Health > Infection and Population Health
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/163050
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