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Not all SCN1A epileptic encephalopathies are Dravet syndrome: Early profound Thr226Met phenotype

Sadleir, LG; Mountier, EI; Gill, D; Davis, S; Joshi, C; DeVile, C; Kurian, MA; ... Scheffer, IE; + view all (2017) Not all SCN1A epileptic encephalopathies are Dravet syndrome: Early profound Thr226Met phenotype. Neurology , 89 (10) pp. 1035-1042. 10.1212/WNL.0000000000004331. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To define a distinct SCN1A developmental and epileptic encephalopathy with early onset, profound impairment, and movement disorder. METHODS: A case series of 9 children were identified with a profound developmental and epileptic encephalopathy and SCN1A mutation. RESULTS: We identified 9 children 3 to 12 years of age; 7 were male. Seizure onset was at 6 to 12 weeks with hemiclonic seizures, bilateral tonic-clonic seizures, or spasms. All children had profound developmental impairment and were nonverbal and nonambulatory, and 7 of 9 required a gastrostomy. A hyperkinetic movement disorder occurred in all and was characterized by dystonia and choreoathetosis with prominent oral dyskinesia and onset from 2 to 20 months of age. Eight had a recurrent missense SCN1A mutation, p.Thr226Met. The remaining child had the missense mutation p.Pro1345Ser. The mutation arose de novo in 8 of 9; for the remaining case, the mother was negative and the father was unavailable. CONCLUSIONS: Here, we present a phenotype-genotype correlation for SCN1A. We describe a distinct SCN1A phenotype, early infantile SCN1A encephalopathy, which is readily distinguishable from the well-recognized entities of Dravet syndrome and genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus. This disorder has an earlier age at onset, profound developmental impairment, and a distinctive hyperkinetic movement disorder, setting it apart from Dravet syndrome. Remarkably, 8 of 9 children had the recurrent missense mutation p.Thr226Met.

Type: Article
Title: Not all SCN1A epileptic encephalopathies are Dravet syndrome: Early profound Thr226Met phenotype
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000004331
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000004331
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CC BY) (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > ICH Developmental Neurosciences Prog
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1572527
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