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Biocompatibility Assessment of Potential Materials for Use in an Ophthalmic Drug Delivery Device

Alband, M; (2017) Biocompatibility Assessment of Potential Materials for Use in an Ophthalmic Drug Delivery Device. Masters thesis , UCL (University College London).

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Abstract

Glaucoma is a chronic optic neuropathy that affects an estimated 70 million people worldwide of which 7 million are blind. The only proven modifiable risk factor is raised intra-ocular pressure (IOP) and treatment to reduce IOP can be in the form of eye drops, laser or surgery. Scarring and the development of fibrous encapsulation at the surgical site complicate glaucoma surgery. Development of a drug delivery platform to modulate the wound healing response may improve surgical outcomes. Potential materials include hydrogels, three-dimensional cross-linked networks of water-soluble polymers, as well as 3D printed resins that are an increasingly popular approach for rapid prototyping and manufacture. The aim of this thesis was to assess the in vitro biocompatibility of 3D printed and phosphorylcholine (PC) based materials compared to materials used in current ophthalmic devices including polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), silicone, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). Sterility testing was performed using ethanol and autoclaving processes. Adhesion of monocytes, macrophages and fibroblasts to material surfaces was assessed using various assays and fluorescent microscopy. Adsorption of albumin and fibrinogen was assessed using SDS Page gel electrophoresis, UV photospectrometry, fluorescein isothiocyanate labelled bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) and micro bicinchoninic acid (BCA) techniques. It was observed that PC based materials demonstrated less cellular and protein adhesion than materials used in current ophthalmic devices but more than a contact lens of similar composition suggesting that the manufacturing process may play a role in the biocompatibility response. Similar levels of cell adhesion and protein adsorption were observed between 3D printed materials and materials used in current ophthalmic devices, but cytotoxicity is a potential concern and further testing is warranted. Our results demonstrate that PC hydrogels and 3D printed materials can potentially be used in drug delivery devices to treat ophthalmic conditions. Future work will focus on optimising the device design, hydrogel formulation and ultimately assessing biocompatibility response in an in vivo setting.

Type: Thesis (Masters)
Title: Biocompatibility Assessment of Potential Materials for Use in an Ophthalmic Drug Delivery Device
Event: University College London (UCL)
Language: English
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1570205
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