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Forshaw and Abercrombie's green legacy: The successes and failures of two London parks

Hill, D; (2005) Forshaw and Abercrombie's green legacy: The successes and failures of two London parks. Doctoral thesis , UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

In the 1943 County of London Plan, Forshaw and Abercrombie proposed a significant increase in the provision of green space focusing on areas of deficiency. Of the planned open space system, only two major parks were created: Mile End Park in Tower Hamlets and Burgess Park in Southwark. These parks were created incrementally over the second half of the twentieth century and remain essentially unfinished. Since the mid-1990s, both parks have received significant capital investment. This thesis uses a mixture of qualitative and quantitative data - drawn mainly from a set of in-depth interviews with key players involved in the in the parks' development - to understand their successes and failings. It has found that Mile End Park has become significantly more successful in the last ten years and is now performing relatively well. Using the chosen measures Burgess Park has been found to have some strengths but is significantly under performing. The thesis then explores the key factors that led to these differing outcomes. These include the continued influence of key individuals, an enabling institutional context, effective partnership working with consensus on the future direction of the park, access to significant amounts of capital funding and ring- fenced ongoing revenue funding, innovative and high-quality design, a complementary mix of uses, a varied and well-publicised events programme and effective community involvement throughout the process.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: Forshaw and Abercrombie's green legacy: The successes and failures of two London parks
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by ProQuest. Third party copyright material has been removed from the ethesis. Images identifying individuals have been redacted or partially redacted to protect their identity.
UCL classification: ?? BG ??
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1568434
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