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An investigation of spoken and written verb morphology production in an individual with acquired aphasia

Kidger, H; (2005) An investigation of spoken and written verb morphology production in an individual with acquired aphasia. Doctoral thesis , UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

Noun-verb dissociation is well-reported in the literature. However, verb morphology in aphasic production is not so widely reported. The current theories regarding noun-verb dissociation centre on semantic-conceptual representation of grammatical category and processing of grammatical category. This is distinct from the semantic level. This study investigates how verb morphology is affected in an individual with acquired aphasia. Noun morphology is analysed to ascertain whether the client's morphology deficit is grammatical-class specific. Verb and noun morphology are compared in the spoken and written modalities to ascertain the presence of a modality-specific effect. Verb errors are categorised as omission or substitution of agreement or tense/aspect. All possible factors, which may influence correct marker production are investigated. Data for this study was gathered from the subject's clinical file and comprised comparable picture and procedural description tasks. Non-comparable tasks were also used to supplement this data. The subject was found to have a greater difficulty with verb than noun morphology and more morphological errors were observed to occur in the written than spoken modalities. Most morphological errors in the spoken modality and dictation tasks comprised marker substitutions, whereas marker omissions were most apparent in the written modality. These results are discussed in relation to the theoretical models of processing.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: An investigation of spoken and written verb morphology production in an individual with acquired aphasia
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by ProQuest.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Language and Cognition
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1567777
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