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Isolation and genetic characterisation of CD133+ VE cell population from a paediatric astrocytoma short-term cell culture

Puglia, A; (2009) Isolation and genetic characterisation of CD133+ VE cell population from a paediatric astrocytoma short-term cell culture. Doctoral thesis , UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

Each year in the UK 4,400 people are diagnosed with primary brain tumours. The most common of these are astrocytomas with the most malignant having poor prognosis despite aggressive treatments. Genetic studies have shown chromosomal changes in adult high-grade astrocytomas which differ to those seen within the paediatric population. In recent years the tumour stem cell hypothesis has been put forward which suggests that tumours have a sub-population of cells similar to adult stem cells. These tumour stem cells can be isolated from other cells in a tumour from their expression of CD 133 protein. The aim of this study was to investigate DNA copy number aberrations of CD 133 positive and CD 133 negative cells found in a paediatric glioblastoma multiforme. Cells expressing CD 133 were isolated using a monoclonal antibody for CD 133 labelled with APC and the expression of CD 133 was confirmed with fluorescence microscopy. DNA was extracted from both CD 133 positive and CD 133 negative cells and copy number aberrations analysed using a high-density oligonucleotide 244k array. DNA copy number aberrations were found to differ between the CD133 positive and CD133 negative cells. Further genetic research of these cell sub-populations may alter the way in which high-grade paediatric brain tumours are treated in the future.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: Isolation and genetic characterisation of CD133+ VE cell population from a paediatric astrocytoma short-term cell culture
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Additional information: Thesis digitised by ProQuest.
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1566866
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