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The effect of calorie restriction on mouse skeletal muscle is sex, strain and time-dependent

Boldrin, L; Ross, JA; Whitmore, C; Doreste, B; Beaver, C; Eddaoudi, A; Pearce, DJ; (2017) The effect of calorie restriction on mouse skeletal muscle is sex, strain and time-dependent. Science Reports , 7 (1) , Article 5160. 10.1038/s41598-017-04896-y. Green open access

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Abstract

Loss of skeletal muscle mass and function occurs with increasing age. Calorie restriction (CR) increases the lifespan of C57Bl/6 mice, but not in the shorter-lived DBA/2 strain. There is some evidence that calorie restriction reduces or delays many of the age-related defects that occur in rodent skeletal muscle. We therefore investigated the effect of short (2.5 month) and longer term (8.5 and 18.5 months) CR on skeletal muscle in male and female C57Bl/6 and DBA/2 mice. We found that short-term CR increased the satellite cell number and collagen VI content of muscle, but resulted in a delayed regenerative response to injury.Consistent with this, the in vitro proliferation of satellite cells derived from these muscles was reduced by CR. The percentage of stromal cells, macrophages, hematopoietic stem cells and fibroadipogenic cells in the mononucleated cell population derived from skeletal muscle was reduced by CR at various stages. But overall, these changes are neither consistent over time, nor between strain and sex. The fact that changes induced by CR do not persist with time and the dissimilarities between the two mouse strains, combined with sex differences, urge caution in applying CR to improve skeletal muscle function across the lifespan in humans.

Type: Article
Title: The effect of calorie restriction on mouse skeletal muscle is sex, strain and time-dependent
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-04896-y
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-04896-y
Language: English
Additional information: Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > ICH Developmental Neurosciences Prog
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > ICH Infect, Imm, Infla. and Physio Med
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1564903
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