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Social networks and patterns of health risk behaviours over two decades: A multi-cohort study

Kauppi, M; Elovainio, M; Stenholm, S; Virtanen, M; Aalto, V; Koskenvuo, M; Kivimaki, M; (2017) Social networks and patterns of health risk behaviours over two decades: A multi-cohort study. Journal of Psychosomatic Research , 99 pp. 45-58. 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2017.06.003. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine the associations between social network size and subsequent long-term health behaviour patterns, as indicated by alcohol use, smoking, and physical activity. METHODS: Repeat data from up to six surveys over a 15- or 20-year follow-up were drawn from the Finnish Public Sector study (Raisio-Turku cohort, n = 986; Hospital cohort, n = 7307), and the Health and Social Support study (n = 20,115). Social network size was determined at baseline, and health risk behaviours were assessed using repeated data from baseline and follow-up. We pooled cohort-specific results from repeated-measures log-binomial regression with the generalized estimating equations (GEE) method using fixed-effects meta-analysis. RESULTS: Participants with up to 10 members in their social network at baseline had an unhealthy risk factor profile throughout the follow-up. The pooled relative risks adjusted for age, gender, survey year, chronic conditions and education were 1.15 for heavy alcohol use (95% CI: 1.06–1.24), 1.19 for smoking (95% CI: 1.12–1.27), and 1.25 for low physical activity (95% CI: 1.21–1.29), as compared with those with > 20 members in their social network. These associations appeared to be similar in subgroups stratified according to gender, age and education. CONCLUSIONS: Social network size predicted persistent behaviour-related health risk patterns up to at least two decades.

Type: Article
Title: Social networks and patterns of health risk behaviours over two decades: A multi-cohort study
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.jpsychores.2017.06.003
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2017.06.003
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Psychiatry, Cohort Studies, Health Behaviour, Longitudinal Studies, Meta-Analysis, Psychosocial Factors, Physical-Activity, Mental-Health, Heart-Disease, Life-Course, Support, Association, Smoking, Adults, Perspective, Outcomes
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1564894
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