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Trauma induces overexpression of Cx43 in human fetal membrane defects

Barrett, DW; Kethees, A; Thrasivoulou, C; Mata, A; Virasami, A; Sebire, NJ; Engels, AC; ... Chowdhury, TT; + view all (2017) Trauma induces overexpression of Cx43 in human fetal membrane defects. Prenatal Diagnosis , 37 (9) pp. 899-906. 10.1002/pd.5104. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We developed an in vitro model to examine whether trauma induces connexin 43 (Cx43) expression and collagen organisation in the amniotic membrane (AM) of fetal membrane (FM) defects. METHOD: Term human FM was traumatised in vitro. Cell morphology and Cx43 were examined in the wound edge AM by immunofluorescence (IMF) confocal microscopy and compared to control AM. Collagen microstructure was examined by second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging. Cell viability was assessed with calcein and ethidium staining. RESULTS: After trauma, the AM showed a dense region of cells, which had migrated towards the wound edge. In wound edge AM, Cx43 puncta was preferentially distributed in mesenchymal cells compared to epithelial cells with significant expression in the fibroblast layer than epithelial layer (p < 0.001). In the fibroblast layer, the collagen fibres were highly polarised and aligned in parallel to the axis of the wound edge AM. There was an absence of cell migration across the defect with no healing after 168 h. Cell viability of the FM after trauma was maintained during culture. CONCLUSION: Cx43 overexpression in wounded AM drives structural changes in collagen that slows down efficacy of cell migration across the FM defect. © 2017 The Authors. Prenatal Diagnosis published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Type: Article
Title: Trauma induces overexpression of Cx43 in human fetal membrane defects
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/pd.5104
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/pd.5104
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Inst for Women's Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Inst for Women's Health > Maternal and Fetal Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > ICH Pop, Policy and Practice Prog
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1560841
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