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Attitudes towards attrition among UK trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology

Gafson, I; Currie, J; O'Dwyer, S; Woolf, K; Griffin, A; (2017) Attitudes towards attrition among UK trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology. British Journal of Hospital Medicine , 78 (6) pp. 344-348. 10.12968/hmed.2017.78.6.344. Green open access

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Abstract

Physician dissatisfaction in the workplace has consequences for patient safety. Currently in the UK, 1 in 5 doctors who enter specialist training in obstetrics and gynaecology leave the programme before completion. Trainee attrition has implications for workforce planning, organization of health-care services and patient care. The authors conducted a survey of current trainees' and former trainees' views concerning attrition and ‘peri-attrition’ – a term coined to describe the trainee who has seriously considered leaving the specialty. The authors identified six key themes which describe trainees' feelings about attrition in obstetrics and gynaecology: morale and undermining; training processes and paperwork; support and supervision; work–life balance and realities of life; NHS environment; and job satisfaction. This article discusses themes of an under-resourced health service, bullying, lack of work–life balance and poor personal support.

Type: Article
Title: Attitudes towards attrition among UK trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.12968/hmed.2017.78.6.344
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.12968/hmed.2017.78.6.344
Language: English
Additional information: This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in British Journal of Hospital Medicine, copyright © MA Healthcare, after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see http://doi.org/10.12968/hmed.2017.78.6.344. This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > UCL Medical School
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Inst for Women's Health
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1560665
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