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Helical cardiac cone beam CT reconstruction with large area detectors: a simulation study.

Manzke, R; Koken, P; Hawkes, D; Grass, M; (2005) Helical cardiac cone beam CT reconstruction with large area detectors: a simulation study. Phys Med Biol , 50 (7) 1547 - 1568. 10.1088/0031-9155/50/7/016.

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Abstract

Retrospectively gated cardiac volume CT imaging has become feasible with the introduction of heart rate adaptive cardiac CT reconstruction algorithms. The development in detector technology and the rapid introduction of multi-row detectors has demanded reconstruction schemes which account for the cone geometry. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, the idea of approximate helical cone beam CT has been extended to be used with retrospective gating, enabling heart rate adaptive cardiac cone beam reconstruction. In this contribution, the ECR technique is evaluated for systems with an increased number of detector rows, which leads to larger cone angles. A simulation study has been carried out based on a 4D cardiac phantom consisting of a thorax model and a dynamic heart insert. Images have been reconstructed for different detector set-ups. Reconstruction assessment functions have been calculated for the detector set-ups employing different rotation times, relative pitches and heart rates. With the increased volume coverage of large area detector systems, low-pitch scans become feasible without resulting in extensive scan times, inhibiting single breath hold acquisitions. ECR delivers promising image results when being applied to systems with larger cone angles.

Type: Article
Title: Helical cardiac cone beam CT reconstruction with large area detectors: a simulation study.
Location: England
DOI: 10.1088/0031-9155/50/7/016
Language: English
Keywords: Algorithms, Electrocardiography, Equipment Design, Equipment Failure Analysis, Feasibility Studies, Heart, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Movement, Phantoms, Imaging, Radiographic Image Enhancement, Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted, Tomography, Spiral Computed, Transducers
UCL classification: UCL > School of BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Medical Physics and Bioengineering
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/156009
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