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Longitudinal associations between television in the bedroom and body fatness in a UK cohort study.

Heilmann, A; Rouxel, P; Fitzsimons, E; Kelly, Y; Watt, RG; (2017) Longitudinal associations between television in the bedroom and body fatness in a UK cohort study. International Journal of Obesity , 41 (10) pp. 1503-1509. 10.1038/ijo.2017.129. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess longitudinal associations between screen-based media use (television (TV) and computer hours, having a TV in the bedroom) and body fatness among UK children. METHODS: Participants were 12 556 children from the UK Millennium Cohort Study who were followed from age 7 to age 11 years. Associations were assessed between screen-based media use and the following outcomes: body mass index (BMI), fat mass index (FMI), and overweight. RESULTS: In fully adjusted models, having a bedroom TV at age 7 years was associated with significantly higher BMI and FMI (excess BMI for boys=0.29, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.06-0.52; excess BMI for girls=0.57, 95% CI 0.31-0.84; excess FMI for boys=0.20, 95% CI 0.04-0.37; excess FMI for girls=0.39, 95% CI 0.21-0.57) and increased risk of being overweight (relative risk (RR) for boys=1.21, 95% CI 1.07-1.36; RR for girls=1.31, 95% CI 1.15-1.48) at age 11 years, compared with having no bedroom TV. Hours spent watching TV or digital versatile disks were associated with increased risk of overweight among girls only. Computer use at age 7 years was not related to later body fatness for either gender. CONCLUSION: Having a TV in the child's bedroom was an independent risk factor for overweight and increased body fatness in this nationally representative sample of UK children. Childhood obesity prevention strategies should consider TVs in children's bedrooms as a risk factor for obesity.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 27 June 2017; doi:10.1038/ijo.2017.129.

Type: Article
Title: Longitudinal associations between television in the bedroom and body fatness in a UK cohort study.
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/ijo.2017.129
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2017.129
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Eastman Dental Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1558992
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