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Dopamine inhibits trigeminovascular transmission in the rat

Bergerot, A; Storer, RJ; Goadsby, PJ; (2007) Dopamine inhibits trigeminovascular transmission in the rat. ANN NEUROL , 61 (3) 251 - 262. 10.1002/ana.21077.

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Abstract

Objective: Clinical evidence, such as premonitory or postdromal symptoms, indicate involvement of dopamine in the pathophysiology of migraine.Methods: To study the influence of dopamine on nociceptive trigeminovascular neurotransmission, we first determined using immunohistofluorescence that dopamine receptors were present in the rat trigeminocervical complex; then using extracellular recording techniques, we examined whether dopamine modulates cell firing in the trigeminocervical complex.Results: We identified a discrete population of D1 receptors (median, 11; interquartile range, 7-30 neurons/hemisection) predominantly located in the deep laminae and a more abundant population of D2 receptors (median,75; interquartile range, 30-99 neurons/hemisection) that were evenly distributed in the trigeminocervical complex. Intravenous dopamine had no effect on trigeminovascular neurons, whereas when dopamine was applied microiontophoretically, a potent reversible inhibition of L-glutamate-evoked firing was observed. The effect of microiontophoretically applied dopamine was dose dependent. Dopamine also strongly inhibited activation of trigeminocervical neurons in response to middle meningeal artery stimulation in vivo with a maximum effect obtained within 10 minutes after the application and return to baseline within 30 minutes.Interpretation: We conclude that central dopamine-containing neurons may play a role in modulating trigeminovascular nociception; these neurons offer an important target that will expand our understanding of migraine and may offer new directions for therapy.

Type: Article
Title: Dopamine inhibits trigeminovascular transmission in the rat
DOI: 10.1002/ana.21077
Keywords: CENTRAL TRIGEMINAL NEURONS, SUPERIOR SAGITTAL SINUS, RECEPTOR MESSENGER-RNA, IN-SITU HYBRIDIZATION, SPINAL-CORD, DORSAL HORN, YAWNING BEHAVIOR, PREMONITORY SYMPTOMS, TUBERAL HYPOTHALAMUS, D2 RECEPTOR
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical Neuroscience
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences > Neuro, Physiology and Pharmacology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/155857
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