UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Optimized isolation and expansion of human airway epithelial basal cells from endobronchial biopsy samples

Gowers, KHC; Hynds, RE; Thakrar, RM; Carroll, B; Birchall, MA; Janes, SM; (2017) Optimized isolation and expansion of human airway epithelial basal cells from endobronchial biopsy samples. Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine 10.1002/term.2466. (In press). Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text (Accepted manuscript)
Gowers_Optimized_isolation_expansion.pdf - ["content_typename_Accepted version" not defined]

Download (1MB) | Preview
[img] Text (Supplementary information)
Gowers_Optimized_isolation_expansion_Suppl.pdf

Download (0B)

Abstract

Autologous airway epithelial cells have been used in clinical tissue-engineered airway transplantation procedures with a view to assisting mucosal regeneration and restoring mucociliary escalator function. However, limited time is available for epithelial cell expansion due to the urgent nature of these interventions and slow epithelial regeneration has been observed in patients. Human airway epithelial cells can be expanded from small biopsies or brushings taken during bronchoscopy procedures but the optimal mode of tissue acquisition from patients has not been investigated. Here, we compare endobronchial brushing and endobronchial biopsy samples in terms of their cell number and their ability to initiate basal epithelial stem cell cultures. We found that direct co-culture of samples with 3T3-J2 feeder cells in culture medium containing a Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, Y-27632, led to the selective expansion of greater numbers of basal epithelial stem cells during the critical early stages of culture than traditional techniques. Additionally, we established the benefit of initiating cell cultures from cell suspensions, either using brushing samples or through enzymatic digestion of biopsies, over explant culture. Primary epithelial cell cultures were initiated from endobronchial biopsy samples that had been cryopreserved prior to the initiation of cell cultures, suggesting that cryopreservation could eliminate the requirement for close proximity between the clinical facility in which biopsy samples are taken and the specialist laboratory in which epithelial cells are cultured. Overall, our results suggest ways to expedite epithelial cell preparation in future airway cell therapy or bioengineered airway transplantation procedures.

Type: Article
Title: Optimized isolation and expansion of human airway epithelial basal cells from endobronchial biopsy samples
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/term.2466
Publisher version: http:dx.doi.org/10.1002/term.2466
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: stem cells; epithelial cells; adult stem cells; cell culture techniques; primary cell culture; trachea; bioengineering; tissue transplantation
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > The Ear Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute > Research Department of Oncology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Respiratory Medicine
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1556897
Downloads since deposit
54Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item