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Role of the acute phase response in the Shwartzman phenomenon.

Pepys, MB; Rogers, SL; Evans, DJ; (1982) Role of the acute phase response in the Shwartzman phenomenon. Clin Exp Immunol , 47 (2) pp. 289-295.

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Abstract

Following elicitation of the local Shwartzman reaction by intradermal injection of Salmonella enteritidis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mice, there was a marked acute phase response which was monitored by measuring the serum levels of serum amyloid P component (SAP) and C3. Prednisolone therapy had no effect on either the cutaneous lesion or the accompanying acute phase response. Also, in vivo complement depletion with cobra factor did not affect the lesion or the SAP response despite gross reduction in serum C3 levels. In contrast, administration of colchicine at the same time as LPS suppressed both the acute phase response and the Shwartzman reaction. Inhibition of the cutaneous reaction by colchicine was abrogated by injecting mice with casein, and unrelated acute phase stimulus, the day before challenge with LPS. These observations suggest that acute phase proteins may participate in pathogenesis of the Shwartzman phenomenon.

Type: Article
Title: Role of the acute phase response in the Shwartzman phenomenon.
Location: England
Keywords: Amyloid, Animals, Colchicine, Complement C3, Lipopolysaccharides, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Prednisolone, Salmonella enteritidis, Serum Amyloid P-Component, Shwartzman Phenomenon, Skin
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Inflammation
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1552132
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