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Where Does Informality Stop and Corruption Begin? Informal Governance and the Public/Private Crossover in Mexico, Russia and Tanzania

Baez-Camargo, Claudia; Ledeneva, Alena; (2017) Where Does Informality Stop and Corruption Begin? Informal Governance and the Public/Private Crossover in Mexico, Russia and Tanzania. The Slavonic and East European Review , 95 (1) pp. 49-75. 10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.95.1.0049.

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Abstract

In this article we challenge the prevalent anti-corruption approaches in three ways. First, rather than discussing the failures of anticorruption reforms and the normative anticorruption rhetoric of the leadership in Mexico, Russia and Tanzania, we explore patterns of informal governance that work effectively, allowing the authorities to stay in power and citizens to access services and resources. Second, we link these practices to the impossibility of a clear public/private divide and identify those practical norms that enable its seamless crossover in these countries. Third, we find that the resilience of corrupt behaviours is associated with the fact that the informal governance norms that we identify across the three cases are permeated with ambivalent meanings and implications. This approach is expected to generate insights relevant to the development of a new generation of more effective anti-corruption measures for countries that suffer from high levels of corruption.

Type: Article
Title: Where Does Informality Stop and Corruption Begin? Informal Governance and the Public/Private Crossover in Mexico, Russia and Tanzania
DOI: 10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.95.1.0049
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.95.1.00...
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright 2017 Claudia Baez-Camargo & Alena Ledeneva
Keywords: Political corruption, Governance, Political parties, Government officials, Ambivalence, Political power, Political elites, State politics, Politicians, Music practice
UCL classification: UCL > School of Arts and Social Sciences
UCL > School of Arts and Social Sciences > SSEES
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1551566
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