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Magnesium sulfate treatment after transient hypoxia-ischemia in the newborn piglet does not protect against cerebral damage

Greenwood, K; Cox, P; Mehmet, H; Penrice, J; Amess, PN; Cady, EB; ... Edwards, AD; + view all (2000) Magnesium sulfate treatment after transient hypoxia-ischemia in the newborn piglet does not protect against cerebral damage. PEDIATR RES , 48 (3) 346 - 350.

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Abstract

Transient perinatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) can lead to delayed cerebral damage beginning 8-24 h after resuscitation. Cerebroprotective therapies applied soon after HI may thus reduce the severity of brain injury. We have previously shown that MgSO4 administration to newborn piglets after HI fails to prevent the delayed global impairment in cerebral energy metabolism characteristic of severe brain damage. However, high extracellular concentrations of magnesium ions have been found to prevent specific excitotoxic neural cell death in vivo and in vitro. This study therefore examined the hypothesis that MgSO4 administration after HI reduces damage in some regions of the brain even though global energy metabolism is unaffected. Twelve newborn piglets were subjected to global cerebral HI by transient occlusion of both common carotid arteries and reduction of the inspired oxygen fraction to 0.12 until cerebral high-energy phosphates, measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy, were significantly depleted. Subjects were randomly assigned to two groups of six: the first received MgSO4 (three doses, 400 mg/kg 1 h after resuscitation and 200 mg/kg at 12 and 24 h), and the second received placebo infusions. At 48 h after the start of the experiment, the piglets were killed and their brains were perfused, fixed, and embedded in paraffin wax. Five-micrometer sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin to allow semiquantitative analysis of the severity and extent of injury to the hippocampus, cerebellum, cerebral cortex, caudate nucleus, thalamus, and striatum and the white matter tracts. There was no difference in the severity of tissue damage between the MgSO4-treated group and the placebo-treated animals in any brain region.

Type:Article
Title:Magnesium sulfate treatment after transient hypoxia-ischemia in the newborn piglet does not protect against cerebral damage
Keywords:MAGNETIC-RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY, ENERGY FAILURE, BIRTH ASPHYXIA, BRAIN INJURY, APOPTOSIS, HYPOTHERMIA, INFANTS, INSULT, RATS
UCL classification:UCL > School of BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Medical Physics and Bioengineering

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