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Nanoparticle theranostics for applications in cancer diagnostics and cancer therapy

Hobson, NJ; (2017) Nanoparticle theranostics for applications in cancer diagnostics and cancer therapy. Doctoral thesis , UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

Traditionally, medicine has been conducted using a diagnostic procedure followed by an appropriate therapy and monitored were possible. On the whole, these steps have happened independently of each other. In recent years however many have started to question this independent approach and have asked whether technologies that seek to combine diagnostics and therapies would be more beneficial at treating diseases. This new medical discipline has been termed theranostics. The aim of this project was to design and synthesise a novel theranostic nanoparticle, using a micelle forming amphiphilic carbohydrate, with the overall hypothesis of determining whether using a nanomedicine that can simultaneously image and treat would improve the effectiveness of a cancer treatment. Super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have gained considerable attention as an MRI contrast agent due to their unique magnetic properties and relatively inoffensive toxicity profile. Before IONPs may be used in a biological environment they must overcome several challenges, including being stable to aggregation and organ targeting. In this project a modified chitosan amphiphilic polymer was used to successfully formulate IONPs into colloidal stable aqueous dispersions using two different methods which produced blackberry nanoparticles and raspberry nanoparticles. The raspberry nanoparticles were extensively characterised in vitro and in vivo and were found to be highly effective as an MRI imaging probe for the liver and spleen. Following this, they were tested for their cancer imaging properties in an in vivo mouse tumour model. The drug loading capacity of the raspberry nanoparticles was investigated using lomustine, paclitaxel and methotrexate, however no effective drug encapsulation was determined in this project. Overall, a highly effective MRI probe was engineered and characterised, although its future success will be determined by its activity towards a disease target.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: Nanoparticle theranostics for applications in cancer diagnostics and cancer therapy
Event: UCL (University College London)
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > UCL School of Pharmacy
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1546610
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