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Long term effects of nightly dexamethasone administration in patients with polycystic ovarian disease.

Lachelin, GC; Judd, HL; Swanson, SC; Hauck, ME; Parker, DC; Yen, SS; (1982) Long term effects of nightly dexamethasone administration in patients with polycystic ovarian disease. J Clin Endocrinol Metab , 55 (4) pp. 768-773. 10.1210/jcem-55-4-768.

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Abstract

The long term effects of nightly dexamethasone administration on basal levels and diurnal fluctuations of circulating gonadotropins, androgens, and cortisol were studied by frequent sampling in four women with polycystic ovarian disease and a similar number of normal women. Basal LH, testosterone, and androstenedione levels were elevated in the patients with polycystic ovarian disease. There were significant diurnal variations of all steroids measured in both groups, with the exception of androstenedione and androstenediol in the polycystic ovarian disease and control subjects, respectively. Nightly dexamethasone administration for 1 month resulted in marked suppression of dehydroepiandrosterone, androstenediol, and cortisol. For testosterone the mean percent decreases of the 24-h transverse means were 15% and 46% for the polycystic ovarian disease and normal subjects, respectively. For androstenedione the mean percent decreases were only 7% and 20%, respectively. The diurnal variation of all steroids disappeared with dexamethasone. These results support the concept that in patients with polycystic ovarian disease the majority of delta 5-androgens is adrenal while the preponderance of elevated testosterone and androstenedione is ovarian in origin. These results do not support the use of long term dexamethasone as an effective agent in suppressing the elevated levels of testosterone and androstenedione in patients with this disease.

Type: Article
Title: Long term effects of nightly dexamethasone administration in patients with polycystic ovarian disease.
Location: United States
DOI: 10.1210/jcem-55-4-768
Keywords: Adult, Androstenedione, Circadian Rhythm, Dexamethasone, Female, Humans, Hydrocortisone, Luteinizing Hormone, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, Testosterone
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Inst for Women's Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Inst for Women's Health > Maternal and Fetal Medicine
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1544636
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