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Relative influences of crossing over and gene conversion on the pattern of linkage disequilibrium in Arabidopsis thaliana.

Plagnol, V; Padhukasahasram, B; Wall, JD; Marjoram, P; Nordborg, M; (2006) Relative influences of crossing over and gene conversion on the pattern of linkage disequilibrium in Arabidopsis thaliana. Genetics , 172 (4) 2441 - 2448. 10.1534/genetics.104.040311.

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Abstract

In this article we infer the rates of gene conversion and crossing over in Arabidopsis thaliana from population genetic data. Our data set is a genomewide survey consisting of 1347 fragments of length 600 bp sequenced in 96 accessions. It has several orders of magnitude more markers than any previous nonhuman study. This allows for more accurate inference as well as a detailed comparison between theoretical expectations and observations. Our methodology is specifically set to account for deviations such as recurrent mutations or a skewed frequency spectrum. We found that even if some components of the model clearly do not fit, the pattern of LD conforms to theoretical expectations quite well. The ratio of gene conversion to crossing over is estimated to be around one. We also find evidence for fine-scale variations of the crossing-over rate.

Type:Article
Title:Relative influences of crossing over and gene conversion on the pattern of linkage disequilibrium in Arabidopsis thaliana.
Location:United States
DOI:10.1534/genetics.104.040311
Language:English
Additional information:PMCID: PMC1456404
Keywords:Arabidopsis, Crosses, Genetic, Crossing Over, Genetic, Gene Conversion, Genes, Plant, Genetic Variation, Genome, Plant, Linkage Disequilibrium, Models, Genetic, Mutation, Recombination, Genetic
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Biosciences (Division of) > Genetics, Evolution and Environment > UCL Genetics Institute

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