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Socioeconomic inequalities in blood pressure in Chilean adults

Guerrero Ahumada, AO; (2017) Socioeconomic inequalities in blood pressure in Chilean adults. Doctoral thesis , UCL (University College London).

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: In Chile hypertension is one of the main health problems and could be contributing importantly to health inequalities. Socioeconomic inequalities in blood pressure have been reported in different countries; however the results are not consistent AIM: To analyse the magnitude of socioeconomic inequalities in blood pressure in Chilean adults and the changes between 2003 and 2010. METHODS: The project used two national household surveys conducted in Chile in 2003 and 2010. The analysis involved three stages. First, socioeconomic inequalities in blood pressure and the role of individual factors were examined using multivariable regression analysis. Second, relative and absolute socioeconomic inequalities were estimated using the relative and slope indices of inequality. Third, a multilevel approach was employed to assess the influence of area-level socioeconomic characteristics on the variation in blood pressure between small areas. RESULTS: Inverse social gradients, both in fully adjusted models and in terms of SII and RII, were observed mainly between SBP and education, in women and those aged 40-59. These inequalities tended to decrease between 2003 and 2010 but some inequalities observed in 2003 were still present in 2010. BMI was the strongest confounder affecting these social gradients. When using a multilevel approach, results revealed that in 2003, the higher the mean small area income, the lower the risk of raised SBP. In 2010, people living in small areas with lower level of schooling, higher unemployment rate and higher deprivation score had higher SBP while small area income was not associated with SBP. CONCLUSIONS: There are socioeconomic inequalities in blood pressure in Chile and although these have decreased over time, social inequalities in women and in people aged 40-59 were still present in 2010. Results suggest that there are area-level socioeconomic factors affecting the variation in blood pressure between small areas.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: Socioeconomic inequalities in blood pressure in Chilean adults
Event: UCL (University College London)
Language: English
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1535336
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