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Social Media in Industrial China

Wang, X; (2016) Social Media in Industrial China. [Book]. Why We Post. UCL Press: London. Green open access

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Abstract

Described as the biggest migration in human history, an estimated 250 million Chinese people have left their villages in recent decades to live and work in urban areas. Xinyuan Wang spent 15 months living among a community of these migrants in a small factory town in southeast China to track their use of social media. It was here she witnessed a second migration taking place: a movement from offline to online. As Wang argues, this is not simply a convenient analogy but represents the convergence of two phenomena as profound and consequential as each other, where the online world now provides a home for the migrant workers who feel otherwise ‘homeless’. Wang’s fascinating study explores the full range of preconceptions commonly held about Chinese people – their relationship with education, with family, with politics, with ‘home’ – and argues why, for this vast population, it is time to reassess what we think we know about contemporary China and the evolving role of social media.

Type: Book
Title: Social Media in Industrial China
ISBN-13: 9781910634646
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.14324/111.9781910634646
Additional information: This book is published under a Creative Common 4.0 International license (CC BY 4.0). This license allows you to share, copy, distribute and transmit the work; to adapt the work and to make commercial use of the work providing attribution is made to the authors (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work). Attribution should include the following information: Christopher Tilley and Kate Cameron-Daum, An Anthropology of Landscape . London, UCL Press, 2017. https://doi.org/10.14324/111. 9781911307433 Further details about CC BY licenses are available at http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/
Keywords: Social media, Internet, China, Migration
UCL classification: UCL > School of Arts and Social Sciences
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1514478
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