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Does the method of detection of breast cancer affect subsequent psychiatric morbidity?

Burgess, CC; Ramirez, AJ; Richards, MA; Potts, HWW; (2002) Does the method of detection of breast cancer affect subsequent psychiatric morbidity? EUR J CANCER , 38 (12) 1622 - 1625.

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Abstract

The aim of this prospective study was to compare the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity following diagnosis of breast cancer between a group of women presenting with screen-detected cancer and a group presenting with symptomatic disease. Psychiatric symptoms were elicited using the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID) and classified according to DSM-III criteria. 61 (46%) of 132 women interviewed experienced an episode of psychiatric disorder between I month before diagnosis and 12 months post-diagnosis. There was no association between detection by screening of breast cancer and psychiatric disorder (Odds Ratio (OR) 0.8, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.4-1.8 P = 0.7). The occurrence of an episode of psychiatric disorder was associated with a previous history of treatment for psychological problems (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.1-5.5, P = 0.02). The results suggest there is no increased risk of developing psychiatric morbidity associated with the detection of cancer through the National Breast Screening Programme. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

Type:Article
Title:Does the method of detection of breast cancer affect subsequent psychiatric morbidity?
Keywords:symptomatic, screen-detected, breast cancer, psychiatric morbidity, WOMEN
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health Care > CHIME

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