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Variations in associations of health risk behaviors among ethnic minority early adolescents.

Viner, RM; Haines, MM; Head, JA; Bhui, K; Taylor, S; Stansfeld, SA; Hillier, S; (2006) Variations in associations of health risk behaviors among ethnic minority early adolescents. J Adolesc Health , 38 (1) 55-. 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2004.09.017.

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To investigate patterns of vulnerability and protection factors associated with risk behaviors and the co-occurrence of risk behaviors in minority ethnicity early adolescents. METHODS: Analysis of data from the Research with East London Adolescents Community Health Survey (RELACHS), a school-based study of a representative sample of 2789 adolescents age 11-14 in 2001 (sample 73% non-Caucasian, 21% born outside the United Kingdom). Questionnaire data were obtained on sociodemographic variables, ethnicity, smoking, drinking, drug use, psychological well-being, physical health, and social support from family and peers. Models of associations for each behavior and co-occurrence of risk behaviors (defined as engaging in > or = 2 behaviors) were developed by hierarchical stepwise logistic regression. RESULTS: Two hundred ninety-two (10.9%) reported 1 risk behavior, 84 (3.1%) reported 2, and 25 (0.9%) reported 3 behaviors. In multivariate models, psychological morbidity was associated with higher risk of all behaviors and co-occurrence, while higher family support was associated with lower risk in all models. Non-Caucasian ethnicity was associated with lower risk of regular smoking and co-occurrence but not drinking or drugs. Birth outside the United Kingdom was associated with lower risk for individual behaviors but not co-occurrence. Religion and religious observance were associated with lower risk of smoking and drinking but not drug use or co-occurrence. Peer connectedness was associated with drug use, but with increased risk. Socioeconomic status was associated only with smoking. CONCLUSIONS: Patterns of associations of personal, family, and environmental factors appear to differ between smoking, drinking, lifetime drug use, and the co-occurrence of these behaviors. Hypotheses regarding common factors related to health risk behaviors may be misleading in ethnic minorities and immigrants. Co-occurrence may represent a distinct behavioral domain of risk that is partly culturally determined.

Type: Article
Title: Variations in associations of health risk behaviors among ethnic minority early adolescents.
Location: United States
DOI: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2004.09.017
Keywords: Adolescent, Adolescent Behavior, Child, Ethnic Groups, Family Relations, Female, Health Behavior, Health Surveys, Humans, Male, Peer Group, Risk-Taking, Sexual Behavior, Smoking, Social Support, Substance-Related Disorders, United Kingdom
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Epidemiology and Public Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > ICH Pop, Policy and Practice Prog
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/151000
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