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Interictal activity is an important contributor to abnormal intrinsic network connectivity in paediatric focal epilepsy

Shamshiri, EA; Tierney, TM; Centeno, M; St Pier, K; Pressler, RM; Sharp, DJ; Perani, S; ... Carmichael, DW; + view all (2017) Interictal activity is an important contributor to abnormal intrinsic network connectivity in paediatric focal epilepsy. Human Brain Mapping , 38 (1) pp. 221-236. 10.1002/hbm.23356. Green open access

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Abstract

Patients with focal epilepsy have been shown to have reduced functional connectivity in intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs), which has been related to neurocognitive development and outcome. However, the relationship between interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) and changes in ICNs remains unclear, with evidence both for and against their influence. EEG-fMRI data was obtained in 27 children with focal epilepsy (mixed localisation and aetiologies) and 17 controls. A natural stimulus task (cartoon blocks verses blocks where the subject was told "please wait") was used to enhance the connectivity within networks corresponding to ICNs while reducing potential confounds of vigilance and motion. Our primary hypothesis was that the functional connectivity within visual and attention networks would be reduced in patients with epilepsy. We further hypothesized that controlling for the effects of IEDs would increase the connectivity in the patient group. The key findings were: (1) Patients with mixed epileptic foci showed a common connectivity reduction in lateral visual and attentional networks compared with controls. (2) Having controlled for the effects of IEDs there were no connectivity differences between patients and controls. (3) A comparison within patients revealed reduced connectivity between the attentional network and basal ganglia associated with interictal epileptiform discharges. We also found that the task activations were reduced in epilepsy patients but that this was unrelated to IED occurrence. Unexpectedly, connectivity changes in ICNs were strongly associated with the transient effects of interictal epileptiform discharges. Interictal epileptiform discharges were shown to have a pervasive transient influence on the brain's functional organisation.

Type: Article
Title: Interictal activity is an important contributor to abnormal intrinsic network connectivity in paediatric focal epilepsy
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/hbm.23356
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.23356
Language: English
Additional information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Shamshiri, EA; Tierney, TM; Centeno, M; St Pier, K; Pressler, RM; Sharp, DJ; Perani, S; (2016) Interictal activity is an important contributor to abnormal intrinsic network connectivity in paediatric focal epilepsy, Human Brain Mapping, which has been published in final form at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.23356. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html#terms).
Keywords: EEG-fMRI, epilepsy, functional connectivity, interictal epileptiform discharges, intrinsic connectivity networks
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Imaging Neuroscience
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > ICH Developmental Neurosciences Prog
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1508666
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