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Appetitive traits and their relationships to weight and weight management

Hunot, CME; (2016) Appetitive traits and their relationships to weight and weight management. Doctoral thesis , UCL (University College London). Green open access

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Abstract

There is a need for novel approaches to weight management (WM) for adults to address the increasing prevalence of obesity. Appetitive traits (ATs) are potentially modifiable stable predispositions towards food, which could be targeted by tailored WM interventions. Research has demonstrated associations between ATs and BMI in children, measured using the parent report ‘Child Eating Behaviour Questionnaire’ (CEBQ). This thesis systematically reviews the psychometric measures of ATs currently available for adults and children (Study 1). This review highlighted that the specific ATs captured by the CEBQ have not been measured in adults and so their relationships to weight remains unexplored beyond childhood. This review therefore demonstrated a need for a self-report version of the CEBQ, the ‘Adult Eating Behaviour Questionnaire’ (AEBQ). Study 2 describes the development of the AEBQ as a reliable measure of ATs in adults. Study 3 confirmed the AEBQ factor structure in a different sample, and showed that ATs were associated with BMI in adults. Study 4 describes the development and preliminary testing of a brief Appetitive Trait Tailored Intervention (ATTI) based on participants’ AEBQ scores, to help with WM in overweight and obese adults. Study 5 involved qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews with participants from Study 4 to provide in-depth understanding of their experiences of the ATTI. Overall, findings suggest that ATs can be measured in adults using the AEBQ, and they have similar associations with BMI to those seen in children. Using AEBQ scores to provide tailored AT feedback for WM shows promise, however refinement of the tips and delivery method is needed prior to further testing of this approach.

Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Title: Appetitive traits and their relationships to weight and weight management
Event: University College London
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
Language: English
Keywords: Appetite, Appetitive traits, Overweight, Obesity, Food responsiveness, Satiety responsiveness
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1508408
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