UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

The importance of the built environment for learning-A research evidence overview

Wall, K; Dockrell, J; Peacey, N; (2010) The importance of the built environment for learning-A research evidence overview. In: (pp. pp. 1016-1025).

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

To understand the significance of the built environment for pupil and teacher classroom activity and the key relationships with classroom acoustics, it is necessary to consider a number of key features of the school built environment. This paper reviews the evidence (psychological, physiological, social, educational and environmental ) for the ways in which the school site, its buildings and grounds provide the infrastructure that supports learning and development in primary schools. Poorly managed, monitored and maintained school environments are associated with negative effects on classrooms, pupils and teachers. However our knowledge and understanding of the interaction between key features in the environment is limited. The review identifies implications for policy and practice for teachers, school managers and those designing and commissioning new schools or renovating existing ones.

Type: Proceedings paper
Title: The importance of the built environment for learning-A research evidence overview
ISBN-13: 9781617823961
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Psychology and Human Development
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Science
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1507355
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item