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Delivering communication strategy training for people with aphasia: what is current clinical practice?

Beckley, F; Best, W; Beeke, S; (2017) Delivering communication strategy training for people with aphasia: what is current clinical practice? International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders , 52 (2) pp. 197-213. 10.1111/1460-6984.12265. Green open access

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Abstract

Background: Communication strategy training (CST) is a recognized part of UK speech and language therapists’ (SLTs) role when working with a person with aphasia. Multiple CST interventions have been published but, to date, there are no published studies exploring clinical practice in this area. / Aims: To investigate UK SLTs’ current CST practices. / Methods & Procedures: Thirty-seven UK SLTs completed an online questionnaire, eight of whom attended a follow-up focus group. A clinical consistency scale was applied to the questionnaire data and tasks that were most consistently used were explored in the focus group and analyzed using a primarily deductive thematic data analysis approach. / Outcomes & Results: Three key CST findings arose: (1) the rarity with which SLTs focus equally and explicitly on both communication partners’ strategies; (2) SLTs’ differing understandings of CST terminologies and concepts and underuse of formal assessment; and (3) the absence of video feedback. / Conclusion & Implications: This study's survey findings suggest that conversation partners not only receive half the amount of CST given to people with aphasia but also play a more passive learning role when they are present. This is an interesting point to consider when the current evidence base contains stronger evidence for the effectiveness of conversation partner CST over other CST approaches, it being described as an effective method that may be maintained over time.

Type: Article
Title: Delivering communication strategy training for people with aphasia: what is current clinical practice?
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/1460-6984.12265
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1111/1460-6984.12265
Language: English
Additional information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Beckley, F; Best, W; Beeke, S; (2016) Delivering communication strategy training for people with aphasia: what is current clinical practice? International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, which has been published in final form at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1460-6984.12265. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving (http://olabout.wiley.com/WileyCDA/Section/id-828039.html#terms).
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Language and Cognition
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1503488
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