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Application of the Environmental Impact Classification for Alien Taxa (EICAT) to a global assessment of alien bird impacts

Evans, T; Kumschick, S; Blackburn, TM; (2016) Application of the Environmental Impact Classification for Alien Taxa (EICAT) to a global assessment of alien bird impacts. Diversity and Distributions , 22 (9) pp. 919-931. 10.1111/ddi.12464. Green open access

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Abstract

AIM: To apply the recently published EICAT protocol to an assessment of the magnitude of environmental impacts of alien bird species established worldwide. LOCATION: Global. METHODS: A review of published literature and online resources was undertaken to collate information on the reported environmental impacts of 415 bird species with self-sustaining alien populations worldwide. The resulting data were then categorised following the EICAT guidelines, and analysed using R. RESULTS: Environmental impact data were found for approximately 30% of species with alien populations. Most alien birds had low impacts, categorised as either Minimal Concern (MC) or Minor (MN). However, 44 bird species had moderate (MO) impacts or above, with five having massive (MV) impacts. Almost half of all impacts identified related to competition between alien birds and native species. Impact magnitudes were non-randomly distributed: Impacts due to predation tended to be more severe than for other impact mechanisms, and impacts on oceanic islands tended to be more severe than for other regions, but impacts associated with Psittaciform species tended to be less severe than for other alien bird orders. Approximately 35% of assessments were allocated a ‘low’ confidence rating. MAIN CONCLUSIONS: The EICAT protocol can be effectively applied to categorise and quantify the impacts of all alien species within an entire taxonomic class. The results demonstrate significant variation in both the type and severity of impacts generated by alien birds. However, we found no data regarding the environmental impacts of the great majority of alien bird species, and where impact data were available, our assessments were frequently allocated a ‘low’ confidence rating. Our work therefore identifies major data gaps that will help influence the direction of future invasive alien species impact research.

Type: Article
Title: Application of the Environmental Impact Classification for Alien Taxa (EICAT) to a global assessment of alien bird impacts
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/ddi.12464
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ddi.12464
Language: English
Additional information: Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [Evans, T., Kumschick, S., Blackburn, T. M. (2016), Application of the Environmental Impact Classification for Alien Taxa (EICAT) to a global assessment of alien bird impacts. Diversity and Distributions, 22: 919–931. doi: 10.1111/ddi.12464], which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ddi.12464. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.
Keywords: Anseriformes, biological invasion, Columbiformes, competition, data deficient, Galliformes, Passeriformes, predation, Psittaciformes
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences > Genetics, Evolution and Environment
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1498677
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